Getting Back to the Data

logoI’m back from a seven-day digital fast. Yep, no Facebook, Twitter, email, YouTube, web surfing for seven days. It was good. I highly recommend it.

The plan was to be completely disconnected for seven days. That plan was changed when I received word from my thesis advisor–the day before the vacation was to start–that I had some major revisions to do on the dissertation. So, instead of completely disconnecting, my digital fast allowed me to become laser focused. I kept one digital pipeline open through my school email account. My advisor and I exchanged a flourish of emails containing rewritten excerpts of the paper, new ideas for reorganizing the information, and desperate sighs of overwhelmedness (is that word? it should be).

I think I successfully revamped the spiritual formation, pedagogical, and suburban framing sections…mostly. Here is the latest task my advisor advised, She said,

I think you need to go back to your data and remind yourself of how you came to the conclusions you’ve found. Pull out the coding and see what you can do to explain that process — again, that can tie back into your methodology section, and it can make your workshop description more analysis and less description.

She also offered a helpful link to provide a rubric in which to work. That is my task for today. I am going to take a deep breath, reopen my NVivo program, and try to retrace my steps as I coded my way through the 470 pages of transcribed group session audio files, and hundreds of pages of emails, journal entries, and online discussion forum data.

Cue the Huey Lewis music, “I gotta back in time…”