Tag Archives: adult learning

Book | In Over Our Heads by Robert Kegan

keganIn over our headsKegan, Robert. In over Our Heads: The Mental Demands of Modern Life. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1994.

The Author – Robert Kegan

Kegan is a professor of Adult Learning at Harvard, specializing in cognitive developmental psychology. He has dedicated his career to studying what he has come to call “the evolving self.” Prior to his quest, which began in the 1980s, the conventional wisdom regarding human cognitive development was that all significant cognitive development ceased in late adolescence. In other words, a person’s ability to change the way they think stops at the onset of adulthood. The only type of change that an adult can expect is technical change. Adults can learn more, but they can’t change the way they learn or perceive the world. Kegan’s research has demonstrated that this is not true. He studied hundreds of people over a number of years and discovered that adults can and do develop—evolve—cognitively beyond adolescence. read more

Article | Mapping a Field: Why and How to Study Spirituality

MAPPING A FIELD WHY AND HOW TO STUDY SPIRITUALITY – this is my annotated copy of the article.

Rather than being flatly individualistic or purely “internal” in nature, spirituality appears today to designate an ensemble of (often disparate) technologies—linguistic, ritual, praxilogical, associative, etc.—through which inner and outer worlds are connected. (10)

Article | Dialogue of the Soul – by Dent Davis

Dialogue of the Soul – My annotated copy

 Findings from this study suggest spiritual encounter is a form of adult learning that leads to changes in perspective and actions in ways that are more inclusive and less combative. The spiritual encounter was experienced as a heuristic process involving a powerful perception of spirit encountered in a third space (Bhahba 1994). Most adult religious education is focused on transmitting content or knowledge based on received norms, doctrines, and customs as a part of formal learning experiences. Study participants reported powerful and formative experiences of spirit often occurring in incidental, informal, and non-formal ways (398) read more