Tag Archives: gadamer

Book | The Open Secret by Lesslie Newbigin

open_secretNewbigin, Lesslie. The Open Secret: An Introduction to the Theology of Mission. Rev. ed. Grand Rapids, MI: W.B. Eerdmans, 1995.

The Author: Lesslie Newbigin

“Born in Newcastle upon Tyne, Newbigin’s elementary and high school education took place in Leighton Park, the Quaker public boarding school in Reading, Berkshire. He went to Queens’ College, Cambridge in 1928. On qualifying, he moved to Glasgow to work with the Student Christian Movement (SCM) in 1931. He returned to Cambridge in 1933 to train for the ministry at Westminster College, and in July 1936 he was ordained by the Presbytery of Edinburgh to work as a Church of Scotland missionary at the Madras Mission.[2] read more

Paper | A Presentation on Hans-Georg Gadamer

Hans-Georg Gadamer | by Steve Thomason | A Term Paper | Presented to Dr. Craig Van Gelder | Luther Seminary | As a Requirement in Course LD8910 The Hermeneutics of Leading in Mission | St. Paul, Minnesota | 2011

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Introduction

oldGadamerHans-Georg Gadamer was born in 1900 and died in 2002. One could say that he was truly a man of the 20th century. This is fitting since his life and work demonstrated the transitional nature of the 20th century as the academic disciplines made a turn from Enlightenment thinking to a postmodern sensibility. Gadamer’s presentation of philosophical hermeneutics was one of the pivotal contributions that brought about that turn. read more

Why Talk About Frames?

Academic types like to talk about frames a lot, at least in my neck of the woods. “Let’s reframe that question.” “Allow me to frame this for you.” You’ll notice that I use the term in my main menu. I discuss the Theoretical Frames, Theological Frames, and the Biblical Frames of my research project.

FramesWhat is a frame, and what do I mean when I say it? The term frame brings three very different images to my mind. The first is a picture frame, or the boundaries in which a photographer/painter captures an image. A picture frame is limited and cannot capture the entire three-dimensional reality it seeks to describe. When taken this way, what is left outside of the frame is as important as what is captured in the frame. read more