Tag Archives: kegan

A Happy Little Scholar Moment

I am an emerging scholar. In other words, I still don’t know exactly what I’m doing and I get really happy when something works and seems scholarly. Something like that happened to me last night.

I am working on my dissertation proposal right now. The first part of the proposal lays out the theoretical lenses that frame my research. One of my lenses is Robert Kegan’s theory of the five orders of consciousness. In the proposal I wrote

“Kegan’s theory intertwines well with other important theoretical and theological frames for my research, namely communicative action, Trinitarian relational ontology, and Social Trinity.” read more

Book | The Open Secret by Lesslie Newbigin

open_secretNewbigin, Lesslie. The Open Secret: An Introduction to the Theology of Mission. Rev. ed. Grand Rapids, MI: W.B. Eerdmans, 1995.

The Author: Lesslie Newbigin

“Born in Newcastle upon Tyne, Newbigin’s elementary and high school education took place in Leighton Park, the Quaker public boarding school in Reading, Berkshire. He went to Queens’ College, Cambridge in 1928. On qualifying, he moved to Glasgow to work with the Student Christian Movement (SCM) in 1931. He returned to Cambridge in 1933 to train for the ministry at Westminster College, and in July 1936 he was ordained by the Presbytery of Edinburgh to work as a Church of Scotland missionary at the Madras Mission.[2] read more

Book | Immunity to Change by Robert Kegan and Lisa Laskow Lahey

9781422129470_p0_v2_s260x420Kegan, Robert, and Lisa Laskow Lahey. Immunity to Change: How to Overcome It and Unlock Potential in Yourself and Your Organization Leadership for the Common Good. Boston, MA: Harvard Business Press, 2009.

The Authors

Robert Kegan

keganProfessor in Adult Learning and Professional Development at Harvard. Founding Principal of Minds at Work.

Lisa Laskow Lahey

LaheyA faculty member at the Harvard Graduate School of education and Founding Principal at Minds at Work.

Introduction

“If you are leading anything at any level, you are driving some kind of plan or agenda, but some kind of plan or agenda is also driving you. It is out of your awareness. You cannot yet take responsibility for it. And most of the time, that agenda will limit or even doom your ability to deliver extraordinary results. If you do not attend as much to “development” as to “leadership,” then your leadership development will always be directed to the plan or agenda you have. It will not be about the plan or agenda that “has you,” and heretofore your capacity for change will inherently be limited.”⁠1 read more