Tag Archives: suburban social issues

Book | The American Suburb by Jon C. Teaford

american-suburb-basics-jon-teaford-paperback-cover-artTeaford, Jon C. The American Suburb: The Basics. New York: Routledge, 2008. 

The Author

Jon C. Teaford is Professor Emeritus of Urban History at Purdue University. I was not able to find much biographical information about him. However, his students rated him extremely high on ratemyprofessors.com. One student said, “Dr. Teaford was the BEST teacher I ever had in my entire educational career and I am a teacher now because of HIM! He made history come to life and is one that I will always remember.” [1] read more

Article | Filling the Governance Gap by Allan Wallis

Read Filling the Governance Gap by Allan Wallis, my annotated copy of this article.

Wallis, Allan D. “Filling the Governance Gap.” National Civic Review 87, no. 1 (1998).

Notes

The dominant vision for regional growth

  1. Ownership of a detached single-family house;
  2. Automobile ownership;
  3. Low-rise workplaces;
  4. Small communities with strong local governments;
  5. Environment free from signs of poverty.

Downs says the dominant vision succeeds admirably in satisfying short-term needs, while simultaneously making it more difficult to solve long-term problems. (103)

Past solutions, notably those that are essentially structural (such as city/county consolidations), offer limited promise for filling the governance gap. Never- theless, some sustaining structure is essential lest regionalism resolve itself to being a celebration of process over substance. But what kind of structure, and how much is needed? “Herein lies a regional paradox,” Savitch and Vogel con- clude. “If metropolitan regions are to pursue effective policies, they must be politically viable (i.e., command popular and elite consensus), yet regional bodies whose policies go beyond the bounds of consensus are apt to lose that viability. In effect, the more aggressive regions become, the less power they possess. Regional bodies must then forever balance these tensions, trading off and adapting themselves to pressure and circumstances. The challenge is to do this while taking a long-term view of the need to convert political legitimacy into broader political mandates.” read more